APIENC’s Dragon Fruit programs uplift and celebrate our QTAPI lineage through the preservation of oral histories and the practice of building intergenerational community care.

QTAPI people have been systematically denied access to our histories and to nurturing intergenerational connections. The contributions of LGBTQ API leaders and activists are often excluded in history lessons, leaving our people to feel invisible, disconnected from our lineage, and like we don’t matter. The Dragon Fruit Oral History Project records and shares the stories of QTAPI leaders so that our people know that we have always existed and have made important contributions to social movements. Together we can learn from QTAPI activists who came before us important lessons to help us build the future of our movements. 

Image description: Participants of the Dragon Fruit Project Walking Tour gather at Compton’s Cafeteria to hear Tamara Ching speak.

For many of our young APIENC members, being a part of the Dragon Fruit Project was their first touchpoint with the larger QTAPI community, and provided new opportunities to connect with community “elders”  in building affirming cross-generational relationships. Likewise, many of the elders who shared their stories with APIENC enjoyed reliving their histories through storytelling and felt seen and appreciated for their work by the younger generations. The Dragon Fruit Network was born from this unique opportunity to connect young and older QTAPI people, and works to intentionally build intergenerational networks of care for our people who are often excluded from movement spaces and may have strained relationships with their biological families. The Dragon Fruit Network hosts workshops, skills shares, and gatherings that build relationships across generations and develops the skills of our people to ask for and offer help in healthy and sustainable ways.

Growing up in Korea and moving to the states I always felt alone. I didn’t know any queer Koreans let alone any queer Asian people who were older than I was. It made me realize that I can be here Because of those who came before me who fought for justice, I can be here and I am not alone. DFP helped me realize there are many adults much older than I am who have paved the way — who are present today and who I can actually share space and time with if I so choose. – Jo Lee

Dragon Fruit Project

Originally created in 2012 by local historian and professor, Amy Sueyoshi, APIENC took on this oral history project in 2013 to uplift the stories of QTAPI people. Since then, over 200 volunteers have recorded over 90 oral histories of LGBTQ API leaders and activists in our community and shared these stories through our online digital portal, Dragon Fruit zines and artwork, our Dragon Fruit walking tour, and interactive community workshops and events. We continue to share the stories of our people in creative and meaningful ways that connect people across generations.

Image description: A sign reads "I am history in the making" sitting on top of colorful feather boas.

Dragon Fruit Network

Stemming from the Dragon Fruit Project, APIENC’s Dragon Fruit Network was developed in 2017 to continue the work of building intergenerational networks of care for QTAPI people. Emphasizing relationship building and learning across generations, the Dragon Fruit Network has hosted intergenerational social gatherings and workshops to develop our skills in asking for help and offering help. Together, we learn and practice mutual care and share our learnings and tools with the broader APIENC community and beyond so that everyone may grow their own networks of care.

Image description: Four QTAPI people are sitting in chairs indoors facing each other.

Learn More


Interactive QTAPI Oral Histories, and more!

Dragon Fruit Project Digital Portal


Check out our first issue!

Dragon Fruit Project Zine


Watch the video!

Dragon Fruit Project at 2015 Listen to the Silence

Watch the video!

DFP Promo Video

Image description: Participants of the Dragon Fruit Project Walking Tour gather at Compton’s Cafeteria to hear Tamara Ching speak.
Image description: A sign reads “I am history in the making” sitting on top of colorful feather boas.
Image description: Four QTAPI people are sitting in chairs indoors facing each other.